Arthritis

The term arthritis comes from the root word for joint “arthro” and “itis” meaning inflammation. Arthritis is a disease process that causes joint pain, stiffness and swelling. It is a complex disorder that comprises more than 100 different conditions and can affect people at any age. Two of the most common forms are Osteoarthritis (OA) and Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).

OA and RA have different causes and effects on the body, yet they often share a common symptom — persistent joint pain. The joint pain of arthritis can appear as knee pain, hip pain, thumb pain, hand pain, or wrist pain, as well as joint pain in other areas of the body. Symptoms of joint pain, stiffness and/or swelling for more than 2 weeks, may indicate you have arthritis.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms of OA include steady or intermittent pain in a joint, stiffness after periods of inactivity, especially sleeping or sitting, swelling or tenderness in a joint or joints and crunching sounds or feelings, called crepitus, when moving a joint.

Symptoms of RA differ from person to person but generally include: Joint tenderness, warmth, and swelling. Both sides of the body are usually affected at the same time. For example, if one knee is affected, the other one is also, unlike osteoarthritis, where it is possible for only one knee to be affected. Other symptoms of include pain and stiffness in the morning that lasts for more than one hour, fatigue, occasional fever and a general sense of not feeling well.

Though arthritis is often perceived to be an older person's disease there is a form of arthritis that can be found in children, teens and young adults called Juvenile Arthritis.

How a Splint Can Help

Many of the splints on this web site were designed to rest inflamed joints while others were designed to protect and properly align joints during the performance of daily activities. Proper splinting may help prevent or reduce the deformities of the fingers and hand caused by arthritis.

Persons with arthritis may need two splints, one to rest the joints at night and one to support the joints while still allowing for function. 

Related Products

Boutonniere Deformity


A Boutonniere Deformity involves the tendons and ligaments of the fingers. The top of the finger has a complex arrangement of tissues of which the top sheet is called the central slip. The central slip helps straighten the PIP joint (middle knuckle) and bend the DIP joint (end knuckle).

A Boutonniere Deformity is often caused by a jamming or crush injury when the middle finger bone tears through the central slip leaving a hole the bone can extend through. The tendons and ligaments that normally straighten the PIP now bend the joint instead. These same tendons and ligaments that helped bend the DIP joint, now hyperextend the fingertip so that it bends backwards.

If left untreated, what seemed like "just a jammed finger", can end up becoming a long term deformity that is not easily corrected with therapy or even surgery. The best treatment for a Boutonniere Deformity is early treatment with appropriate splinting or casting.

Symptoms

The term Boutonnière (French for Buttonhole) Deformity refers to a finger where the middle joint (the PIP joint) is stuck in flexion (bent towards the palm) and the end joint (DIP joint) hyperextends (bends backwards). The middle finger joint may be enlarged due to a jamming injury and the finger may be painful to the touch for several weeks after an injury has occurred.

How a Splint Can Help

Oval-8 Finger Splints  can be used on both the PIP joint and on the DIP joint to hold them in the proper position while the tissues heal. One or two splints can be used on each joint to hold them straight and may need to be worn for several weeks.

3pp Buddy Loops are recommended in milder cases of jammed or crushed fingers. 3pp Buddy Loops secure the injured finger to the adjacent finger(s) so the healthy finger can help the finger move without the need to use the muscles of the injured finger.

Related Products

Bunion



(Image courtesy of Footlogics Australia)

A bunion, known as Hallux (toe) Valgus (a term for outward angulation) is a bony bump that forms on the joint (the MTP joint) at the base of your big toe. The big toe joint becomes enlarged, forcing the toe to crowd against the other toes. This puts pressure on the big toe joint, pushing it outward beyond the normal profile of the foot, and resulting in pain. Bunions can also occur on the joint of the little toe (bunionette or Tailor's bunion).

Bunions can occur for a number of reasons, but a common cause is wearing shoes that fit too tightly. They can also develop as a result of injury, inherited structural defects, stress on your foot or another medical condition.

Symptoms

Symptoms may include pain and soreness over the bump, redness from rubbing against the shoe, a burning sensation or possibly numbness. Other conditions which may appear with bunions include calluses on the big toe, sores between the toes, ingrown toenail, and restricted motion of the toe.

Symptoms often occur when wearing shoes with a tight or narrow toe box (the front of the shoe) or high heels. This may explain why women are more likely to have symptoms than men. In addition, spending long periods of time on your feet can aggravate the symptoms of bunions.

Related Products

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome


Three nerves travel down the arm and into the hand to act as the electric cords that supply power to the small muscles in the hand and feeling to the skin. The median nerve travels through the center of the palm and passes through a “tunnel” formed by the carpal or small wrist bones and a thick ligament that acts as the base of the tunnel. The median nerve travels through the tunnel and then forms branches to supply feeling to the thumb, index, middle fingers and half of the ring finger. With nine tendons and the median nerve passing through the small tunnel, anything that reduces the space in the tunnel may compress the median nerve and cause the symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

Swelling in the hand or thickening of the tendons or other soft tissues in the hand may compress the median nerve. This compression, if unrelieved, may cause the nerve to “short out” much as a compressed or bent electrical cord will cause the lights to flicker or go out. Over time, if the nerve remains under pressure, it loses its ability to send signals to the muscles and skin and permanent damage will occur that cannot be corrected by treatment or surgery.

Symptoms

Symptoms of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) often start with numbness or “pins and needles” (tingling) feeling in the thumb, index and middle fingers. The fingers may “fall asleep” particularly at night when sleeping with the wrist bent. This may cause the sleeper to wake up and “shake” their hand out in order to restore normal feeling in the fingers.

If the problem goes untreated, tingling may occur during the day along with numbness or loss of feeling in the fingers. This numbness can lead to difficulty holding onto small objects and weakness in the thumb due to the muscle’s wasting or shrinking from lack of stimulation.

Related Products

Claw Toes

Claw toes result from a muscle imbalance which causes the ligaments and tendons to tighten and bend the toes. This results in the joints curling downwards. Arthritis and nerve damage from diabetes can weaken the muscles in your feet and lead to claw toes. Claw toe get worse without treatment and may become a permanent deformity over time.

Claw toes are classified as flexible or rigid. In a flexible claw toe, the joint can be manually straightened. A rigid claw toe cannot be straightened out manually. Movement is very limited and can be extremely painful. This sometimes causes foot movement to become restricted leading to extra stress at the ball-of-the-foot, and possibly causing pain and the development of corns and calluses.

Symptoms

A claw toe is a toe that is bent at the PIP and DIP joints (middle and end joints in the toe), and can lead to severe pressure and pain. Ligaments and tendons that have tightened cause the toe's joints to curl downwards. Claw toes may occur in any toe, except the big toe. There is often discomfort on the top of the toe from rubbing against the shoe and at the end of the toe that is pressed against the bottom of the shoe.

Related Products

CMC (basal) Joint Arthritis



Named for the bones that make up the base joint of the thumb - the trapezium, one of the small Carpal bones of the wrist, and the Metacarpal or long bone of the thumb - the carpometacarpal (CMC) joint is the most common site for arthritis in the hand. In the most common form of arthritis, Osteoarthritis (OA) or Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD), the cartilage that covers and protects the joints, wears out. Without the protective cartilage, the bones in the joint grind against one another wearing the joint down and causing pain and instability.

As the disease progresses, the CMC joint may sublux (slip out of place), causing the thumb to collapse into the palm, forming a “Z” or zigzag deformity. This collapse deformity makes it difficult to open the thumb away from the palm and makes grasping and pinching progressively more difficult.

Symptoms

Pain at the base of the thumb where it joins the wrist is the most common symptom of CMC joint arthritis. Pain is most commonly felt when trying to pinch or grip something tightly or when holding onto something small like a pen or a key. Pressure that pushes down on the thumb may also cause pain that is often described as “grinding” pain.

Related Products

Cumulative Trauma Disorder

CTD, Cumulative Trauma Disorder,  is a collective term for syndromes characterized by discomfort, impairment and loss of muscle strength and function. CTD may be related to a specific activity which causes pressure on or irritation of a nerve, tendon or muscle. CTD, especially Carpal Tunnel Syndrome may be of unknown origin with no specific activity causing the symptoms.

Holding static postures for long periods of time while performing an activity may cause stress on muscles which then press on nerves and inflame tissues. Mechanical stress, vibration and cold may also contribute to the onset of CTD. It is difficult to know what leads one person to develop a CTD when another person performing the same task has no symptoms. It is therefore difficult to predict what activities may affect someone before the symptoms appear.

Symptoms

The terms Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD), Repetitive Stress Injury (RSI) and Overuse Syndrome, all describe impairment or pain related to a certain activity or group of activities. The most frequently diagnosed CTD of the hand is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS).

The symptoms of CTS are numbness and tingling in the thumb, forefinger and long finger of the hand. In advanced CTS, there may be weakness in the hand and a loss of muscle strength, especially in the small muscles of the thumb.

Other CTD’s in the arm and hand include Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) from pressure on the nerves above the collar bone; Cubital Tunnel Syndrome from pressure on the Ulnar Nerve as it passes around the elbow, and de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis, an inflammation of the tendons that straighten the thumb.

Related Products

DeQuervain’s Tenosynovitis


DeQuervain’s Tenosynovitis (D-quare-vanes T-no-sigh-no-vie-tis) is an inflammation of the synovial tissue that covers the tendons that straighten and pull the thumb away from the hand (“hitchhiker” position). The tendons involved are the ones along the thumb side of the wrist that are prominent when the thumb is extended away from the hand. The indentation formed between these two tendons is known as the Thenar Snuffbox. Inflammation of the tendons or of the tissue that surrounds them, causes swelling and restricts the tendons' ability to glide back and forth to move the thumb.

The most common cause of de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis is overuse from lifting or performing side to side motions with the hand. Sometimes the condition develops for no known reason. Treatment is the same if the cause is known or not.

Other names for the same condition are "styloid tenosynovitis", "de Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis" or "mother's wrist". The latter came into use because it is a common condition with young moms. Common misspellings include "dequervains" and "de quervians". The condition is named after Fritz de Quervain, a Swiss surgeon.

Symptoms of De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

Pain along the thumb side of the wrist is the most common symptom of de Quervain’s tenosynovitis. The pain may radiate down to the end of the thumb or up along the thumb side of the forearm. Pain is most commonly felt when reaching the thumb across the palm or when flexing (bending) the wrist and turning it towards the little finger (ulnar deviation). Pain may also be felt when pressure is applied over the tendons that run along the outside of the thumb and wrist.

Related Products

Dislocation - Toe

A toe dislocation is diagnosed when the ends of the bones that make up the IP joints are no longer in straight alignment. The IP joint is a hinge joint that allows only flexion (bending) and extension (straightening) and includes several ligaments. Any tearing or disruption of these ligaments may cause the bones that make up the toe joints to push through the ligaments causing a dislocation. One bone may be displaced on top of or below the other bone or it may be pushed to the side. Dislocation is typically associated with forced hyperextension (bending backwards) or hyperflexion (bending down) and it requires immediate reduction.

Symptoms

Pain, swelling and any unusual angulation of the toe after an injury may indicate a possible dislocation of the joint connecting two bones. The toe has two joints, the end joint is called the DIP joint and the one where the toe and the foot meet is called the PIP joint. Either joint can be dislocated by being forcefully bent back or down especially when running and during sporting activities.

Related Products

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS) is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders. There are six major forms of the disorder. All the forms affect the joints and many also affect the skin.

Symptoms

Hypermobile or Type III is the most common form of EDS. The most common symptoms of Hypermobile Ehlers Danlos Syndrome are loose, unstable joints and chronic (long term) joint pain. People with excessive joint mobility, what is incorrectly called “double jointed”, may in fact have a form of EDS.

Symptoms of Classical EDS, the second most common form, include highly elastic, fragile skin that tears or bruises easily. Wound healing can be slow and loose joints are prone to dislocation.

Related Products

Fracture - Finger

Any break in the continuity of a bone is considered a fracture. A fracture may be non-displaced – a fracture line or lines are seen but the bone stays in its normal alignment, or displaced – bone is moved out of its “in-line” position. The most common finger fractures are traumatic, caused by a direct blow or crushing injury. Treatment of a traumatic fracture depends on the location and extent of the break and whether it is displaced. You should consult your doctor if you have experienced an incident causing great force to the finger or a crushing impact. Early treatment is important to a successful outcome.

Symptoms

Most finger fractures are caused by a trauma such as a fall onto the hand. Signs of a broken finger include pain when touching the bone, swelling, difficulty moving the finger and deformity of the finger.

Related Products

Fracture - Toe

Any break in the continuity of a bone is considered a fracture. A fracture may be non-displaced – a fracture line or lines are seen but the bone stays in its normal alignment, or displaced – bone is moved out of its “in-line” position. The most common toe fractures are traumatic, caused by a direct blow or crushing injury caused by dropping something on your toe. Treatment of a traumatic fracture depends on the location and extent of the break and whether it is displaced. You should consult your doctor if you have experienced an incident causing great force to the toe or a crushing impact.

Symptoms

Point tenderness, pain and swelling of a toe following a crushing injury or strong jamming or stubbing of the toe may indicate the presence of a fracture in one of the phalanxes of the toe. Any severe injury of the toe should be x-rayed to determine the presence and extent of any bone fracture.

Related Products

Gamekeeper’s Thumb


Gamekeeper’s Thumb
is a tearing or stretching of the ligaments along the outside of the thumb. Gamekeeper’s Thumb can be caused by a strong blow to the thumb or it can be caused by progressive (one that occurs over time) injury of the ligament that connects the two bones at the MCP joint. This ligament, the Ulnar (on the little finger side of the hand) Collateral (side) Ligament (UCL), may be stressed and torn over time due to specific activities that stress this joint.

Symptoms

Pain, tenderness and instability of the thumb MCP joint (the joint at the level of the thumb web space), may indicate Gamekeeper’s Thumb. The thumb may appear crooked, as though it is leaning away from the hand.

Related Products

Golfer’s Elbow



The large bone of the upper arm, the Humerus, ends in protrusions known as the medial (inside) and lateral(outside) epicondyles. The muscles of the forearm and hand attach near or on the epicondyles and may be irritated or torn with repeated twisting, lifting or flexion and extension of the wrist (motion up and down). The motion of swinging a golf club and the resistance caused by hitting a ball, can lead to tearing of the muscle attachments at the elbow.

Epicondylitis can be caused by any activity that requires repeated twisting or flexion and extension of the wrist or by carrying a heavy load with the elbow extended. Activities such as painting or “spring cleaning” may cause the pain associated with Golfer’s Elbow.

Symptoms

Pain felt around the bony protrusions on the inside of the elbow upon lifting the wrist or hand or with twisting motions of the forearm are symptoms of Golfer’s Elbow. Pain might also be felt when applying pressure over or around the inside of the elbow. Golfer’s Elbow (Medial Epicondylitis) may be diagnosed when the pain is felt on the medial, or inside, of the elbow when bending the wrist, making a fist, or twisting the forearm. You need not play golf to have a diagnosis of Golfer's Elbow.

How a Splint Can Help

Along with appropriate anti-inflammatory medicines, the treatment for acute (sudden onset) Golfer’s Elbow is to rest the muscles and tendons around the elbow. Since the muscles that bend and straighten the wrist start at the elbow, resting the wrist as well as the elbow is suggested.
The Wrist Control can be used to rest the wrist in extension. Using a wrist splint along with using the 3pp Elbow Wrap during the day to relieve stress around the elbow can help relieve the pain and allow the tendons to heal.

Related Products

Hammer Toes

Hammer toes are toes that rest in a bent position at the middle joint and are hyperextended (curling upwards) at the end. Tight ligaments and tendons cause the joints of the toes to curl downwards. Hammer toe may result from shoes that don’t fit properly or from a muscle imbalance. Muscles work in pairs to straighten and bend the toes and when there is an imbalance of the forces on the toes, the muscles tighten and cannot stretch out.

Shoes with narrow toes push the smaller toes into a flexed (bent) position. The toes rub against the shoe, leading to the formation of corns and calluses, which further aggravate the condition. High heeled shoes force the toes against the shoe, increasing the pressure and the bend in the toe. Eventually, the toe muscles are unable to straighten the toe, even when there is no confining shoe.

Symptoms

A hammer toe is a toe that is bent downwards at the middle joint of the toe. The end joint of the toe will curls up, making the toe look like a “hammer”. Initially hammer toes are flexible and can be stretched out straight. Over time, without proper treatment, hammer toes can become fixed and can only be corrected by surgery.

There is often discomfort on the top of the toe due to rubbing against the shoe. People with hammer toe may have corns or calluses on the top of the middle joint of the toe or on the tip of the toe. They may also feel pain in their toes or feet and have difficulty finding comfortable shoes.

How a Splint Can Help

Conservative treatment starts with new shoes that have soft and roomy toe boxes (the front of the shoe). Shoes should be one-half inch longer than your longest toe and should have a deep toe box that makes room for the hammer toe. Sandals may help, as long as they do not pinch or rub other areas of the foot. Exercises to stretch and strengthen the muscles are often helpful.

To help keep flexible hammer toes on a stretch during the day, use 3pp Toe Loops. These soft, cushioned straps allow you to hold the toe(s) on a slight stretch and they cushion the top of the toes to lessen the formation of calluses. 3pp Toe Loops can be worn with any toe.

Related Products

Jammed Finger

The term "jammed finger" commonly refers to injuries to the proximal interphalangeal joint (PIP) of the finger (the middle knuckle). A jammed finger injury most often occurs when there is forceful pressure exerted along the length of the finger. This force along with hyperextension (bending backwards) can disrupt the complex arrangement of ligaments around the PIP joint.

Swelling around the joint and stretching or tearing of these ligaments can result in a PIP joint permanently bent into flexion (towards the palm) and loss of extension (straightening) at the DIP joint just below the fingernail (also see definition of Boutonniere Deformity).

The anatomy of the PIP joint is complex and several types of injuries can result in permanent disability if left undiagnosed or untreated. Injury to the PIP joint is common in athletics, especially ball-handling sports, and can cause serious long term problems if left untreated.

Symptoms

Swelling of the PIP joint, joint tenderness and loss of motion are evidence of a jammed finger. In severe cases, bruising will be evident and there may also be loss of motion at the DIP joint. An x-ray is necessary to rule out a fracture.

How a Splint Can Help

Once a fracture has been ruled out, a jammed finger is generally rested in full extension (straight). Use two Oval-8 Finger Splints to hold the PIP joint in extension. When motion is allowed, the adjacent uninjured finger will help the injured finger move by using a 3pp Buddy Loop to hold the fingers together. A 3pp Final Flexion Wrap may be used to help regain full bending of the finger at the PIP and DIP joints.

Related Products

Tennis Elbow



The large bone of the upper arm, the Humerus, ends in large protrusions known as the medial (inside) and lateral(outside) epicondyles. The muscles of the forearm and hand attach near or on the epicondyles and may be irritated or torn with repeated twisting, lifting or flexion and extension of the wrist (motion up and down). The motion of swinging a racquet and the resistance caused by hitting a ball, can lead to tearing of the muscle attachments at the elbow.

Epicondylitis can be caused by any activity that requires repeated twisting or flexion and extension of the wrist or by carrying a heavy load with the elbow extended. Activities such as painting or “spring cleaning” may cause the pain associated with Tennis Elbow.

Symptoms

Pain felt around the bony protrusions on the side of the elbow upon lifting the wrist or hand or with twisting motions of the forearm are symptoms of Tennis Elbow. Pain is most commonly felt on the outside of the elbow when extending the wrist (lifting the hand towards the forearm) or twisting the forearm. Pain might also be felt when applying pressure over or around the sides of the elbow. You need not play tennis or golf to have a diagnosis of “Tennis or Golfer’s” Elbow.

How a Splint Can Help

Along with appropriate anti-inflammatory medicines, the treatment for acute (sudden onset) Tennis Elbow is to rest the muscles and tendons around the elbow. Since the muscles that straighten the wrist start at the elbow, resting the wrist as well as the elbow is suggested.

The 3pp Wrist Control can be used to rest the wrist in extension. Using a wrist splint along with the 3pp Elbow Wrap to reduce tension on the tendons around the elbow, can help relieve the pain and allow the tendons to heal.

Related Products

Ligament Injury

The finger has a complex arrangement of ligaments (thin bands of connective tissue) that stabilize the joints and guide motion. Finger joint injuries such as sprains, avulsions, jams, and dislocations all involve the ligaments of the fingers and occur often in contact and non-contact sports. Many finger joint injuries are mild and require minimal treatment, but others require aggressive initial management to prevent long term problems.

The most common ligament injuries occur at the PIP (middle) joint of the fingers and the MP joint of the thumb (at the level of the web space). Ligaments may be torn, stretched or displaced. Most injuries will require some form of immobilization during healing and mobilization to restore motion.

Symptoms

Swelling, pain and tenderness over the joint or along the sides of the joint may indicate a ligament injury. Stiffness and pain with motion are also symptoms of ligament injury. If mild, the finger may stay stiff and painful for a few days. In more severe injuries, pain and stiffness may persist for weeks or even months without proper treatment.

How a Splint Can Help

Once a fracture has been ruled out, limited movement of the involved joint should start soon after injury. 3pp Buddy Loops are ideal to protect the finger by splinting it to an adjacent finger while allowing controlled flexion and extension. With hyperextension injuries of the PIP joints, an Oval-8 Finger Splint may be used to provide an extension-block to prevent stretching the ligament on the palmar or bottom side of the PIP joint.

Related Products

Mallet Finger


The tendon that straightens the end of the finger attaches to a small piece of bone on the top of the DIP (end joint near the fingernail) joint. With forceful flexion or a crushing injury, the tendon may be torn or it may actually pull away from its attachment to the bone. Sometimes a small piece of bone breaks off when the tendon is forcefully disrupted. If left untreated, what seems a minor problem can end up a long term deformity that is not easily corrected with therapy or even surgery. The best treatment for a Mallet Finger is early treatment with appropriate splinting or casting. It is recommended to see a doctor to ensure correct treatment.

Symptoms

A Mallet Finger, sometimes called a “baseball finger” is a condition in which the end joint (the DIP joint) of a finger bends but will not straighten by itself. The finger can be pushed into a straight position but it will not stay straight without support.

How a Splint Can Help

The standard treatment for a Mallet Finger is to immobilize it in a straight position full time for 4 to 6 weeks. Oval-8 Finger Splints from 3-Point can be used on the DIP joint to hold it in extension while still allowing the middle joint (PIP joint) to bend. One or two splints can be used to hold the DIP joint in a straight position. Oval-8 splints are easy to wear and can be worn full time until the finger heals or further treatment is recommended. The Oval-8 splints must be fit and adjusted by a health care professional to assure proper positioning of the finger.

Related Products

Metacarpal Fracture

The metacarpals are the long bones in the hand. There are five metacarpals counting from one for the thumb and five for the little finger. A fifth metacarpal fracture is the most common metacarpal fracture and usually occurs from hitting a hard object. That is why a 5th metacarpal fracture is called a boxer’s fracture. Fractures of the 4th and 5th metacarpal may also occur from falling onto the hand. Most frequently the bone fractures close to the MP joint where the little finger joins the hand. Fractures of the 2nd and 3rd metacarpals (those attaching to the index and long fingers) are a less frequently occuring fracture.

Symptoms

Pain, swelling, and tenderness and bruising on the little finger side of the hand are the most common symptoms. There may be a bump on the top or little finger side of the hand or it may look crooked. Pain will be felt particularly when trying to make a fist and the little finger may not straighten out fully when the fingers are extended.

How a Splint Can Help

Treatment for metacarpal fractures includes having it x-rayed to determine the location and extent of the fracture. If the fracture is in good alignment, a cast or splint will be used to hold the ring and little fingers bent at the large (MP) knuckle and straight at the middle and end joints. This keeps the tissues around the joint on a stretch so they do not tighten up while the fracture heals. Healing generally takes 4 to 6 weeks.

Related Products

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis (OA), or degenerative joint disease, is one of the oldest and most common types of arthritis. It is characterized by the breakdown of cartilage in the joint. Cartilage is the cushion at the end of the bones where they meet to form a joint. Cartilage breakdown causes bones to rub against each other, causing pain and loss of movement.

Most commonly affecting middle-aged and older people, OA can range from mild to very severe. It affects hands and weight-bearing joints such as knees, hips, feet and the back. Although age is a risk factor, OA is not an inevitable part of aging. Obesity may lead to osteoarthritis of the knees. In addition, people with joint injuries due to sports, work-related activity or accidents may be at increased risk of developing Osteoarthritis.

Symptoms

The most common symptom of OA is pain in the affected joint(s) after use. Pain is usually worse later in the day. There can be swelling, warmth, and creaking in the joints. Pain and stiffness may occur after long periods of inactivity, for example, after a long drive. In severe osteoarthritis, complete loss of cartilage causes friction between bones, causing pain at rest or pain with limited motion.

The basal joint of the thumb (the CMC joint) is the most common site for arthritis in the hands. Pain is commonly felt when holding or pinching objects. CMC joint arthritis is typically age related and is more common in women.

The small joints of the fingers may develop bony enlargement or nodules over time. If the enlargement is at the DIP joint (small knuckle at the end of the fingers) they are called Heberden’s nodes. If the PIP joints (middle joint of the fingers) are enlarged, the nodes are called Bouchard’s nodes.

How a Splint Can Help

Splints help to protect joints from strain and stress. Strong muscles are important to support affected joints.  For arthritis of the thumb there are several excellent splints to choose from. For CMC (basal) joint arthritis, choose the 3pp ThumSling, or the 3pp ThumSaver MP . To rest the thumb at night,the 3pp Ultra Spica provides rest for the thumb and wrist.

For wrist pain, the 3pp Wrist Wrap, Cindy Splint and Wrist Control are excellent choices.

For painful fingers and those in the early stages of developing nodes and joint enlargement, Oval-8 Finger Splints can provide protection and gentle corrective force to possibly lessen the formation of nodes.

Maintaining good hand strength with Reflex Putty is important. Consult your physician or therapist before beginning a strengthening program so they may guide you in the proper level of exercise to perform.

Related Products

Overlapping Toes

Toes that deviate and cross on top of or under an adjacent toe are called overlapping toes. Constrictive shoes with narrow toe boxes (the front portion of the shoe) squeeze the toes together so they eventually begin to overlap. Bunions, a deviation of the big toe, can cause pressure on adjacent toes causing them to overlap. In those with high arches who put more weight on the outside of their feet, especially children, the fifth toe will tend to overlap the fourth toe.

Symptoms

Pressure and irritation between the toes are signs of pressure that can lead to overlapping toes. Pain and inflammation can make walking difficult and if not relieved, the pressure can cause soft calluses between the toes and hard calluses on top of the toes from rubbing inside your shoes.

How a Splint Can Help

3pp Toe Loops are an easy to use, soft alternative to splinting the toes to hold them in proper alignment. The soft foam lining allows the wearer to position and rotate toes as necessary to achieve good alignment and reduce overlapping. 3pp Toe Loops cushion the toes to prevent callus formation.

Related Products

Plantar Fasciitis

The plantar (bottom of the foot) fascia (a band of tissue) is a thin layer of tissue that supports the arch of the foot. The plantar fascia runs from the heel to the base of the toes. Plantar Fasciitis (PF) is generally the result of small tears or over stretching of the plantar fascia. These tears can result from overuse (running too fast without proper warm up), or from exertion such as pushing something heavy.

Symptoms

Sharp stabbing or burning pain in the heel on the inside of the foot is the most common symptom. This frequently occurs in the morning when first walking and stretching the foot. Once the foot limbers up, the pain usually diminishes but it may return after long periods of standing, climbing stairs or getting up from a seated position. Exercise may temporarily relieve the pain only to have it return once you have stopped exercising.

How a Splint Can Help

Gentle stretching during the day along with icing the foot for 10-15 minutes after exercising can be very successful in reducing the symptoms of Plantar Fasciitis. Keeping the plantar fascia on a gentle stretch at night by wearing the 3-Point Products PF Lift Splint, greatly reduces the morning pain and discomfort. Usually recommended to be worn at night, the 3pp PF Lift is of a thin, yet strong material, that can be worn in a shoe.

Related Products

Repetitive Stress Injury

Repetitive Stress Injury (RSI) is a collective term for syndromes characterized by discomfort, impairment and loss of muscle strength and function. RSI may be related to a specific activity which causes pressure on or irritation of a nerve, tendon or muscle. Repetitive Stress Injury, especially Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, may be of unknown origin with no one activity causing the symptoms.

Holding static postures for long periods of time while performing an activity may cause stress on muscles which then press on nerves and inflame tissues. Mechanical stress, vibration and cold may also contribute to the onset of RSI. It is difficult to ascertain exactly what leads one person to develop RSI when another person performing the same task has no symptoms. It is therefore difficult to predict what activities may affect someone before the symptoms of stress appear.

Symptoms

The terms Cumulative Trauma Disorder (CTD), Repetitive Stress Injury (RSI) and Overuse Syndrome, all describe impairment or pain related to a certain activity or group of activities. The most frequently diagnosed CTD of the hand is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS).

The symptoms of CTS are numbness and tingling in the thumb, forefinger and long finger of the hand. In advanced CTS, there may be weakness in the hand and a loss of muscle strength, especially in the small muscles of the thumb.

Other CTD’s in the arm and hand include Thoracic Outlet Syndrome (TOS) from pressure on the nerves above the collar bone; Cubital Tunnel Syndrome from pressure on the Ulnar Nerve as it passes around the elbow, and de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis, an inflammation of the tendons that straighten the thumb.

How a Splint Can Help

For those experiencing the pain and tingling of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, the Cindy Splint and 3pp Wrist Control all provide excellent wrist support to maintain the recommended position of the carpal tunnel.

The 3pp Ultra Spica positions the thumb to relieve symptoms of de Quervain’s Tenosynovitis.

Related Products

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is a chronic (long lasting) inflammatory illness. In RA, the immune system is affected and begins to attack and destroy normal tissues. RA generally affects the tissue and fluids that surround joints, known as synovial tissue. Because synovial tissue is found around other organs such as the heart and lungs, RA is considered a systemic disease, affecting multiple systems in the body.

Rheumatoid Arthritis affects more than two million people in the United States. The disease is three times more common in women than in men. The disease can begin at any age, but most often starts after age forty and before sixty. In some families, multiple members can be affected, suggesting a genetic basis for the disorder. It is not known what causes RA in an otherwise healthy individual. In some, it may be due to a genetic link as noted above, but the majority of cases are of unknown origin.

Symptoms

The primary symptom of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is pain and joint swelling, especially in the small joints of the hands and feet. Symptoms may first be noticed in the morning and include stiffness, pain and joint tenderness. Extreme fatigue is also a symptom of RA. RA may progress slowly but in some cases it causes severe symptoms and joint deformity from the beginning.

How a Splint Can Help

Deformity in the fingers is a common problem in RA. 3-Point Products’ Oval-8 Finger Splints stabilize and support the fingers to improve hand function. Oval-8 splints reduce the common deformities known as Swan Neck and Boutonniere deformities.

The proper use of splints to rest and support the hands has been shown to reduce pain and stiffness and to improve or prolong normal function. Resting the hands at night in a Comforter Splint maintains proper alignment of the bones and tendons and eliminates stress on the hands from poor positioning. The Polycentric Ulnar Deviation Splint is suggested to protect and hold the fingers in neutral alignment during the day.

Thumb problems are common in RA. Thumbs take a great deal of stress throughout daily activities and splints can help reduce this stress and improve strength and function. The 3pp ThumSling, 3pp ThumSaver MP, and 3pp Ultra Spica are just a few of the 3-Point splints suggested for persons with RA.

3pp Toe Loops can be used to help hold toes in straight alignment and to reduce pressure on toes caused by deformity.

Related Products

Rotated Toes

Rotated toes typically is a turning or rotation of the toes, most commonly the fifth or small toe. This may be due to an altered stance where the foot turns inwards and weight is transferred to the side of the small toe. Other toes may rotate when affected by the muscle or tendon imbalance that causes hammer toes and bunions.

Symptoms

Calluses on the side of a toe or rubbing and sores on an adjacent toe are some symptoms of rotated toes.

How a Splint Can Help

3pp Toe Loops are suggested to cushion and help derotate toes that roll or rotate under.

Related Products

Scaphoid Fractures

The scaphoid bone is one of the carpal (wrist) bones located on the thumb side of your wrist, close to your forearm. Scaphoid fractures account for about 60 percent of all wrist fractures. They occur most commonly in men ages 20 to 40 years, and are less common in children or in older adults. The break usually occurs during a fall on the outstretched wrist. It’s a common injury in sports and motor vehicle accidents.

Most of the time, a broken bone is obvious. The area around the break may be painful, swollen or deformed. But sometimes a bone can break without you realizing it. Many people with a fractured scaphoid think they have a sprained wrist instead of a broken bone because there is no obvious deformity and very little swelling.

If you’ve fallen and think you’ve sprained your wrist, see your doctor as soon as possible. Your physician will ask you to describe what happened, examine your hand and wrist, and order X-rays of the area. It may be difficult to see a scaphoid fracture on the first set of X-rays. Even if the initial X-rays do not show a scaphoid fracture, your physician may immobilize your wrist in a cast or splint for a week or so.

Symptoms

The symptoms of a scaphoid fracture are similar to those of a sprained wrist. There will be pain and tenderness on the thumb side of the wrist. There may be some swelling around the base of the thumb and gripping things may be painful. The symptom that most distinguishes a scaphoid fracture from a sprained wrist is marked tenderness to pressure on the "anatomical snuffbox," a triangular-shaped area on the side of the hand between two tendons that lead to the thumb.

How a Splint Can Help

You may be asked to wear a splint that immobilizes the thumb and wrist for a week or two while your physician runs tests to see if you have fractured the scaphoid bone.

Scaphoid fractures heal slowly depending on where the fracture site is. Healing time can range from six weeks for fractures in the top portion of the scaphoid to six months for fractures in the lower portion. You may need to wear a splint once the cast is removed to support your wrist and thumb while you go through therapy to regain your motion and strength. The 3pp Ultra Spica is an excellent choice for post-cast splinting.

Regaining strength will take time. Reflex Putty is excellent to help restore hand, thumb and wrist strength.

Related Products

Scars

Scars are fibrous tissues that replace normal skin (or other tissue) after the normal tissues have been cut, torn or otherwise disrupted. Scarring is a natural part of the healing process.

Scar tissue is not the same as the tissues it replaces. It is tougher and often binds to the normal tissue around it, preventing motion and gliding of the soft tissues. A scar may be termed Hypertrophic or Keloid if it is unusually thick and raised.

Symptoms

Scars that adhere to underlying tissues often are tender and they may be deep red in color. The area around the scar may be firm to the touch. If scars are in the hand, it may be difficult to bend or straighten the fingers or wrist if scars prevent the tendons that move the fingers from gliding.

How we Can Help

The 3-Point Products’ Scar Rx Scar Management System includes three products that help soften and minimize scars.

The SkinSational is a massage tool that aides in loosening scars and mobilizing the soft tissues around the scar. The gentle rubber head is well tolerated for massage once the external scar has healed.

SacredEarth Botanicals massage lotion and scar care oil are organic products specfically developed for scar massage and can be used with the Skinsational for a deep massage.

Gel Mate Silicone Gel Sheeting has been proven to help flatten and soften scars and reduce discoloration. The Gel Mate is self-adherent and easy to wear night and day between scar massage sessions.

Related Products

Skier’s Thumb

Skier’s Thumb is an injury of the Ulnar (on the little finger side of the hand) Collateral (side) Ligament (UCL) of the thumb. Skier’s Thumb is usually due to a fall on the thumb or a jamming injury that pushes the thumb sideways, away from the hand. This injury is commonly seen in skier’s who catch their thumb on their ski poles as they fall. A complete tear of the UCL will result in an unstable joint that literally “falls” away from the hand. This injury is a common sports related injury.

Symptoms

Acute pain along with instability at the MCP joint (the joint at the level of the web space) after a fall or jamming injury are the common symptoms of Skier’s Thumb. You may actually have heard a “tearing” sound when you fell. Your thumb may bend away from your hand and it will be difficult to straighten it back up.

How a Splint Can Help

3-Point has several splints designed to stabilize and protect the thumb MCP joint. In severe cases or for protection during play, the ThumSaver MP, or 3pp Ultra Spica will protect the thumb from further injury until surgery can be performed to reattach the ligament.

Related Products

Spinal Cord Injury

A spinal cord injury usually begins with a sudden, traumatic blow to the spine that fractures or dislocates vertebrae. The damage begins at the moment of injury when displaced bone fragments, disc material, or ligaments bruise or tear into spinal cord tissue. Most injuries to the spinal cord don't completely sever it. Instead, an injury is more likely to cause fractures and compression of the vertebrae, which then crush and destroy the axons, extensions of nerve cells that carry signals up and down the spinal cord between the brain and the rest of the body. An injury to the spinal cord can damage a few, many, or almost all of these axons. Some injuries will allow almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis.

Symptoms

Spinal cord injury can leave minimal weakness to complete paralysis at different body levels. When the cord is injured at or above shoulder level, the arms, and hands will be affected along with the trunk and lower limbs. Loss of hand and finger motion may severely restrict hand function. Properly fit positioning splints or braces can greatly improve function and independent in daily activities.

How a Splint Can Help

Several 3-Point splints help to position the wrist and thumb so that even with minimal motion, hand function is made possible. The ThumSaver splint is recommended for positioning the thumb to improve pinch and grip. Oval-8 finger splints may be helpful to stabilize the fingers for better hand function.

Related Products

Sprain or Strain

A strain is an inflammation of the tendons that connect muscles to the bones and is typically caused by overuse or repetitive use. If left untreated the strained tendons can start to pull away from the muscle with slight tearing progressing to tendinitis. The strained muscle area should be rested and allowed to heal.

A sprain is an overstretching or tearing of a ligament or group of ligaments. Ligaments attach bone to each other and also attach organs to other structures. Sprains are graded as minor, moderate or severe and treatment varies with the severity

Symptoms

Tenderness, pain and mild swelling usually occur with a strain. Pain will generally be localized but it also can be “referred” meaning it can travel to a different spot in the arm or leg. Pain may be minor and persist over a few days or several weeks if the tendons are not rested. Strains can become chronic if the activity causing the strain is not stopped.

In a minor sprain, the ligaments may be lightly overstretched with some minor pain and swelling but little loss of function. A moderate sprain is a partial tearing of a ligament causing increased pain, swelling and in some cases bruising. A severe sprain is a complete tearing of a ligament or group of ligaments. Severe pain and swelling are obvious immediately and there is significant loss of function of the part.

How a Splint Can Help

Resting the strained or sprained part is important for healing and to prevent further injury. The 3pp Wrist Control and Cindy splint are suggested for wrist sprains and strains. 3pp soft thumb splints, ThumSaver splints and 3pp Ultra splints are suggested for sprains and strains of the thumb.

Related Products

Stroke/Cerebral Vascular Accident

 A stroke happens when blood flow to the brain is interrupted. There are two different kinds of stroke. The most common is an ischemic (is-kem-ic) stroke, caused by a blood clot that blocks a blood vessel or artery in the brain. The other, less common, is a hemorrhagic (hem-or-ag-ic) stroke, caused when a blood vessel in the brain ruptures and spills blood into the surrounding tissue. Brain cells in the area begin to die, either because they stop getting the oxygen and nutrients they need to function, or they are killed by the rupture of the vessel and sudden spill of blood.

Symptoms

The symptoms of stroke happen quickly. The most noticeable symptoms include: numbness or weakness in the face, arms, or legs (especially on one side of the body); confusion, difficulty speaking or understanding speech; vision disturbances in one or both eyes; dizziness, trouble walking, loss of balance or coordination and severe headache.

The effects of a stroke range from mild to severe depending on the type of stroke, area of the brain affected, and the extent of the damage. Those who have survived a stroke may experience paralysis, pain, or numbness, as well as problems with thinking and speaking.

How a Splint Can Help

Maintaining the hand and wrist in a safe and functional position is important to prevent possible contractures. It is common after a stroke to lose control of the arm and hand. Positioning the hand in a Comforter Splint at night can lessen the effects of tight or spastic muscles and will keep the fingers and wrist supple to allow you to work on regaining motion. To help keep the thumb in a position of function (so you can use it to pinch and grip), the ThumSaver MP, or 3pp Ultra Spica are recommended. Your Occupational Therapist will help choose the appropriate hand splint for your condition.
As you regain motion, regaining hand strength is important. Choose Reflex Putty to help regain strength in the muscles that bend and straighten the fingers.

Related Products

Swan Neck Deformity


The most common causes of a Swan Neck deformity are a diagnosis of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), an untreated Mallet or “Baseball” finger, and congenital (born with) Swan Neck. Swan Neck deformity is a common problem in people with a connective tissue disease known as Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS).

Swan Neck deformity is common in RA as joint inflammation stretches the soft ligaments and capsules that keep the joints and tendons in proper alignment. When the tissue that normally keeps the finger from bending backwards is compromised, the PIP joint (the joint in the middle of the finger) stretches into hyperextension and the resulting imbalance causes the DIP (the joint closest to the finger tip) to bend down into flexion.

A Mallet Finger (loss of the ability to extend or straighten the DIP joint) if untreated, can result in imbalance of the tendons and ligaments that normally bend the PIP joint. The ligaments that normally lie on top of the finger are torn at their distal (end) attachment. Without this attachment, the ligaments apply more force across the PIP joint, pulling it into hyperextension.

Many people are born with loose or lax joints that is often misnamed “double jointed”. This laxity allows the fingers to bend backwards without there being any injury or indeed, without it being a problem. In severe cases, treatment with appropriate splints is called for. For persons with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, this hyperflexibility is progressive and can result in significant problems using the hands. Splinting for persons with EDS is an important aid to hand function.

Symptoms of Swan Neck Deformity

A Swan Neck deformity is characterized by hyperextension (bending “backwards”) at the PIP joint (the middle knuckle) and flexion (bending down towards the palm) at the DIP joint (the end knuckle). In severe cases, the finger cannot be flexed at the PIP joint without passively (using the other hand) bending the finger to get it “started”.

How a Splint Can Help

Oval-8 Finger Splints from 3-Point Products are designed to keep the finger in proper alignment and prevent hyperextension at the PIP joint. Often when hyperextension at the PIP is controlled, the ability to control motion at the DIP joint is also improved.

Related Products

Tendinitis

Tendinitis is inflammation or irritation of a tendon — any one of the thick fibrous cords that attach muscles to bone. Some common names for tendinitis are tennis elbow, golfer's elbow, pitcher's shoulder, de Quervain’s (tendinitis of the thumb) and trigger finger.

Tendinitis is usually caused by overuse or repetitive stress. The cause may be as simple as spring cleaning for a day or painting walls, to playing in the first ball game of the season without proper warm up and preparation.

Symptoms

Tendinitis produces pain, tenderness and stiffness in the inflamed area. If tendinitis is severe and leads to the rupture of a tendon, you may need surgical repair. This is especially true if the rupture is in the Achilles tendon, the tendon just above the heel. In most cases, rest and medication to reduce pain and inflammation may be the only treatment you need.

If the sheath of tissue that surrounds the tendon becomes scarred and narrowed, it may cause the tendon to lock in one position, such as in the condition called trigger finger. The pain of tendinitis is usually worse with activities that use the muscle that is attached to the involved tendon.

How a Splint Can Help

Rest, anti-inflammatory drugs and icing are the best prescription to reduce the pain of tendinitis. For mild symptoms of tendinitis, 3-Point Products carries a full line of soft, flexible splints that support but do not fully limit motion. Splints such as the 3pp Wrist Wrap and the 3pp Elbow Wrap are ideal to help relieve mild symptoms.

For more severe tendinitis where complete rest is required, look for splints with firm control such as the 3pp Ultra Spica for the thumb and the Cindy Splint for the wrist during the day. Oval-8 Finger splints can be used to immobilize the fingers to rest tendinitis and are recommended to help relieve trigger finger without limiting hand function.

Related Products

Thumb Arthritis



The thumb is the most common site for arthritis in the hand. Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as Degenerative Joint Disease (DJD) as well as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) affect the thumb. The thumb has three joints of which the basal or CMC joint is the most commonly affected.

The CMC joint is named for the bones that make up the base joint of the thumb - the trapezium, one of the small carpal bones of the wrist, and the metacarpal or long bone of the thumb. In OA, the cartilage that covers and protects the joints, wears out. Without the protective cartilage, the bones in the joint grind against one another wearing the joint down and causing pain and instability.

The MP joint (the middle joint at the level of the web space) and the IP (end knuckle) can be affected by cartilage breakdown and also by changes in the pull and alignment of the tendons that cross the joint. Changes at the CMC joint may cause it to sublux (slip out of place), causing the MP and IP joints to shift positions as well. The resulting zigzag or “Z” deformity is common in both OA and RA.

Symptoms

Pain in the CMC joint is the most common symptom of thumb arthritis. Pain is most commonly felt when trying to pinch or grip something tightly or when holding onto something small like a pen or a key. Pressure that pushes down on the thumb may also cause pain that is often described as “grinding” pain.

The MP joint of the thumb, is also a common site for pain as well as for deformity. This joint in particular may appear “crooked” resting in either a bent position or hyperextended. This is due to alteration in the pull of the ligaments that cross this joint.

How a Splint Can Help

3-Point Products specializes in designing splints for thumb arthritis. For light support the 3pp ThumSling and 3pp ThumSling Long support the CMC joint and apply light compression to help reduce pain.

For moderate to firm support, the ThumSaverMP realign the thumb without limiting wrist motion. If you are experiencing severe pain or a sudden increase in pain and need to fully rest the thumb, the 3pp Ultra Spica is recommended.

Related Products

Trigger Finger


Trigger Finger
is an inflammation of the tendon(s) that flex or bend the finger(s). The flexor tendons travel through the palm and into the fingers. The tendons act as cords that pull the fingers down into a fist and then relax as the extensor tendons on the back of the hand straighten the fingers. As they travel through the palm, they glide through a thin sheath of material lined with lubricating synovium that aids in smooth movement. The tendons pass through a series of pulleys that hold the tendons close to the finger. Anything that reduces space inside the tendon sheath or that compresses the space it moves through, can cause the tendon to get stuck as it goes through the pulley.

Think of the tendon as a line on a fishing rod and the pulleys as the eyelets that keep the line in contact with the rod as it bends and straightens. A knot in the line may make the line catch as it is pulled through the eyelet. If the knot keeps getting larger or the pulley gets tighter, eventually it will be too large to slide back in the other direction and the line will be stuck. That is what happens to the tendons. They simple get too large to move back and forth through the pulleys.

Symptoms of Trigger Finger

The most common symptom of Trigger Finger is a clicking or locking of the fingers when attempting to straighten them from a fisted position. Typically a finger will get stuck with the big knuckle and middle knuckle in a bent position. In severe cases, the finger needs to be passively  straightened by using the other hand. Triggering is frequently experienced at night or in the morning after sleeping with the hand in a fisted position for a long period. There may be tenderness when pressure is applied over the base of the finger on the palm side of the hand.

How a Splint Can Help

Oval-8 Finger Splints help reduce triggering by limiting finger flexion. By limiting finger motion, the tendon is less likely to get caught in the pulley and it has the chance to rest and heal. Oval-8 splints can be worn during the day and at night. They are ideal to use after the finger has been injected with an anti-inflammatory medication. The splint allows the finger to rest and the injection to be fully effective.

Related Products

Ulnar Deviation


Ulnar deviation
, also known as ulnar drift, describes a condition where the wrist or fingers shift in the direction of the Ulna, the bone on the little finger side of the forearm. The primary cause is Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). RA causes inflammation at the MP joints (the large knuckles) along with displacement and possibly rupture of the tendons that cross these joints. The carpal (wrist) bones will start to deviate or shift towards the thumb side of the hand while the fingers deviate towards the little finger or ulnar side.

Symptoms

Ulnar deviation generally occurs over time and is related to the severity of your RA. Persons with enlarged MP joints with synovitis (inflammation of the tissues and fluid surrounding the joints) will note a “spongy” feel to the joints. The initial symptoms of deviation may be difficulty to fully straighten your fingers at the MP joints and a slight “windswept” look to the fingers. Grip and pinch strength are diminished and hand function becomes more difficult over time.

How a Splint Can Help

While there is no direct research that shows that wearing hand splints or practicing joint protection techniques will prevent or correct deformity, splinting has been shown to improve hand strength and function. The Polycentric Ulnar Deviation Splint was designed specifically as a day-time splint for those with ulnar deviation at the MP joints. The splint maintains the fingers in straight alignment while still allowing for full motion at each joint.

For additional support if the Polycentric Hinged Ulnar Deviation Splint is no longer enough for daytime wear, 3pp has the Radial Hinged Ulnar Deviation Splint available.

Its counter part is the Comforter splint. Resting the wrist and fingers at night in a Comforter Splint can lessen the effects of morning stiffness and swelling. Oval-8 Finger Splints provide stability to weakened joints and lessen stress on the joints.

Related Products